Evolution, Mind, and Behavior Conference at UCSB

Fall Quarter 2006

 

Joint UCLA-UCSB Conferences held quarterly by
UCSB’s Evolution, Mind, and Behavior Program (EMB) and
UCLA’s Human Nature and Society Program (HNAS)

Saturday 4 November 2006

In the Flying A Studio, University Center, UCSB (UCEN)
(see directions below)

Schedule:

10:00 AM
Breakfast buffet opens
10:30 AM
First Talk: Scott Grafton Hammering nails, dancing the two step and picking up a fine bottle of wine: How do we merge watching and doing to build a hierachy of action knowledge?
12:00 PM
Lunch (UCEN, no host)
1:30 PM
Second Talk: Nathan Wolfe Evolution, Hunters, and the Emergence of Viruses into Human Populations
3:00 PM
Coffee break
3:30 PM
Third Talk: Lawrence Sugiyama In Sickness and in Health: Health risk, health care, health outcomes and the evolution of human life history
5:30 PM
Adjourn for no-host dinner, Ming Dynasty (see below)

Details:

10:30 AM

Scott Grafton UCSB Psychology email

Hammering nails, dancing the two step and picking up a fine bottle of wine: How do we merge watching and doing to build a hierachy of action knowledge?
Abstract: To be posted. In the meantime, Scott Grafton is the new director of the UCSB Brain Imaging Center, and one of the world's leading experts in fMRI, TMS, and other technologies for exploring the brain/mind.


1:30 PM

Nathan Wolfe
UCLA Medical School, Dept. of Epidemiology email

Evolution, Hunters, and the Emergence of Viruses into Human Populations
Abstract: To be posted. Nathan Wolfe is moving to UCLA this fall. He is establishing the first global network to monitor the transmission of viruses including Ebola, SARS, AIDS, Nipah, and monkeypox from animals into human populations. By creating surveillance systems among people who are highly exposed to wildlife, such as subsistence hunters in Africa and wet market workers in Asia, Wolfe and his colleagues are discovering previously unknown viral threats to humanity and identifying the factors that influence how new viruses emerge. Through this research, the group works to identify ways to control potentially catastrophic pathogens before they develop into pandemics.


3:30 PM

Lawrence Sugiyama Dept. of Anthropology, University of Oregon (affiliate, UCSB Center for Evolutionary Psychology) email

In Sickness and in Health: Health risk, health care, health outcomes and the evolution of human life history
Abstract: Delayed maturity and long lifespan, thought to have co-evolved with human entry into the “cognitive niche,” all else equal should increase human mortality risk, yet humans have lower extrinsic mortality than closely related species. Understanding why humans experience low mortality could therefore hold the key for understanding a variety of evolved human features and … the evolutionary history of our species (Hill and Kaplan, [1999], p. 413). Indeed, health risk, care, and health-related outcomes are intricately related to almost every aspect of human life history, affecting not only mortality risk, but growth, cognitive development, mate value, fertility, parental investment, coalitional value, offspring value and so on, such that human life history cannot be understood apart from the causes and consequences of differential health (and phenotypic quality more generally; e.g., Sugiyama 2005). The Shuar Life History Project: Causes and consequences of variation in health and health related outcomes, co-organized with the Hospital Sucua and the Federacíon Shuar,was organized to understand variance in Shuar health via examination of life history tradeoffs that affect it. This is important for humanitarian as well as scientific reasons. In the context of rapid change, Shuar in different areas are experiencing different environmental, social, and economic circumstances. There is significant variance in Shuar health, and understanding the causes of this variance allows us not only to test hypotheses related to the evolution of human life history, but also to identify the key factors associated with poor health and health related outcomes, issues of key concern for health education and development among the Shuar. In this talk I trace the development of this project as it arose from work on patterns of illness, injury, and disability, the evolution of health care provisioning and its effects on mortality reduction, and the development of foraging, economic and social skills. I will then present some of our preliminary data on Shuar children’s growth, health, and health-related measures in the context of larger project questions and goals.



Additional Information:
Dinner: (Self-funded) Ming Dynasty, 290 Storke Road, Goleta
Phone:
805-968-1308. Located at the intersection of Storke and Hollister in Goleta. In the unlikely event you are coming from 101, take Storke exit North of UCSB.
Directions: Take 101 North toward Santa Barbara. There is a double exit (Patterson; then 217 UCSB / Airport). Take the 217 UCSB exit. Follow the signs to campus (when road forks, take the left fork).

When you come into UCSB from 217, there is a UCSB gate & kiosk. Stop there to get a campus map. Turn left onto Lagoon Road (ocean on your left), then
right onto UCEN road, and park in one of the lots.

There may be car pools coming from UCLA; ask Martie Haselton and Clark Barrett
Parking: UCSB will honor parking stickers issued by UCLA, as long as these are prominently displayed on the lower left side of your windshield. If you do not have a UCLA sticker, please note that parking has changed at UCSB; You cannot park in places marked "Enforced 24 hours." Other spaces are numbered and you need to get a ticket, which can be bought from a machine in the parking lot. The closest lot is #3 (but this has a number of illegal spaces, so be careful). Other close lots are #7, 9, and 4; See UCSB map for lot location. The UCEN is located at coordinate F3.

Sponsors: The UCSB Center for Evolutionary Psychology and the UCLA Center for Behavior, Evolution and Culture. This event is organized as a working seminar for faculty and graduate students. For their generous support of this conference, we thank the UCSB Division of Math, Life, and Physical Sciences, the Division of Social Sciences, and the College of Letters and Sciences. For more information, please contact CEP Lab Manager June Betancourt or call 805-893-8720.

UCLA and UCSB will hold two conferences per year, alternating between the two campuses.